Monday, 30 July 2012

Common tailorbird

Orthotomus sutorius

Photo by Allen To (Images of Birds of Hong Kong)

Common name:
common tailorbird (en); costureiro-rabilongo (pt); couturière à longue queue (fr); sastrecillo común (es); rotstirn-schneidervogel (de)

Order Passeriformes
Family Sylviidae

This species is found in southern Asia, from Pakistan and India to southern China and Indonesia.

These birds are 10-14 cm long and weigh 6-10 g.

The common tailor bird is found in forests, mangroves, scrublands, plantations, agricultural land and within urban areas.

They mainly glean insects from foliage, namely beetles and bugs, but are also known to visit to the flowers of Bombak, Salmalia and other large flowers for nectar.

Common tailorbirds can breed all year round, varying between different locations. The nest cup is made of soft plant fibres and placed inside a group of green leaves sewn together by the birds using fibres. The careful sewing allows the leaves to remain alive and green which helps camouflage the nest. The female lays 2-5 pastel blue eggs with brown speckles, which she incubates alone for 12-14 days. The chicks are fed by both parents and fledge 14 days after hatching.

IUCN status - LC (Least Concern)
This species has a very large breeding range and is reported to be common. The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

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